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Months after Baltimore bridge collapse, Dali leaves port, most sailors head home

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Eight crew members that were on the ship that struck the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore are home after around three months on the Dali. A judge ruled on Thursday, June 21, that the men could return on the condition that they would be available for future depositions as the investigation into the crash and bridge collapse continues.

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A spokesperson for the ship’s management said that he expected two more crew members to return from the United States soon.

Investigators said that there is no need to keep the men in the United States any longer since they have already been questioned by the Justice Department. The crew had been unable to leave the ship because of they were considered witnesses in the ongoing investigation. Crew members also did not have valid visas or shore passes.

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Meanwhile, on Monday, June 24, the Dali left the Port of Baltimore, with four crew members on board.

Four tugboats helped the vessel as it began its journey to Norfolk, Virginia. Around 1,500 containers will be off-loaded to reduce draft, according to the Coast Guard. The sailors aboard the Dali are from India and Sri Lanka.

The Coast Guard and FBI continue to investigate the crash that caused the Francis Scott Key bridge to collapse and killed six construction workers who were on the bridge at the time.

The National Transportation Safety Board previously reported that the Dali lost power several times before it hit a column on the bridge. The agency is still investigating the electrical issues.

Officials expect the bridge to be rebuilt by 2028 with a price tag of around $1.9 billion. The Dali’s owner tried to cap damages at $43 million. Monday was also the deadline in Maryland to submit proposals to rebuild the bridge.

Earlier this month, the Fort McHenry federal channel reopened after crews cleared wreckage from the river.

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[LAUREN TAYLOR]

EIGHT CREW MEMBERS STUCK ON THE DALI SINCE IT STRUCK THE FRANCIS SCOTT KEY BRIDGE THREE MONTHS AGO ARE BACK HOME. AND  MORE SAILORS ARE ON THEIR WAY.

A SPOKESPERSON FOR THE SHIP’S MANAGEMENT COMPANY SAID TWO MORE WERE DUE TO LEAVE THE U-S SOON AFTER A JUDGE SAID THE MEN COULD LEAVE ON THE CONDITION, THEY WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR FUTURE DEPOSITIONS.

INVESTIGATORS SAID THERE IS NO NEED TO KEEP THE MEN IN THE U-S ANY LONGER SINCE THEY HAVE BEEN QUESTIONED BY THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT.

THE CREW MEMBERS HAD BEEN UNABLE TO LEAVE BECAUSE OF THE ONGOING INVESTIGATION, AND LACK OF VALID VISAS OR SHORE PASSES.

THE VESSEL LEFT THE PORT OF BALTIMORE MONDAY WITH ONLY FOUR OF ITS ORIGINAL CREW OF 21.

THE DALI, AIDED BY FOUR TUGBOATS TRAVELED TO NORFOLK, VIRGINIA, AS PART OF A TRIP EXPECTED TO TAKE UP TO 20 HOURS. 

THE U-S COAST GUARD AND FBI CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE THE CRASH THAT CAUSED THE BALTIMORE BRIDGE TO COLLAPSE– KILLING SIX CONSTRUCTION WORKERS.

OFFICIALS EXPECT THE BRIDGE TO BE REBUILT BY 2028 WITH A PRICE TAG OF AROUND ONE-POINT-NINE BILLION DOLLARS. 

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