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Ray Bogan

Political Correspondent

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Politics

Conservative media isn’t covering Kari Lake Supreme Court dismissal

Apr 22

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Ray Bogan

Political Correspondent

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Media Landscape

See who else is reporting on this story and which side of the political spectrum they lean. To read other sources, click on the plus signs below.

Learn more about this data

Left 27%

Center 45%

Right 27%

Bias Distribution Powered by Ground News

The Supreme Court declined to hear Kari Lake’s challenge to the use of electronic voting machines in Arizona. Lake, R, sued ahead of the 2022 midterms when she was running for governor. Now, Lake is running for the Senate and her lawyers argued that’s why the case is still relevant and should be heard. 

According to the Straight Arrow News Media Miss™ tool, right-leaning outlets are ignoring this story. A majority of the organizations covering this story are considered center and more than one-third of the sources are left-leaning. However, none of the sources are right- leaning. 

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Here are examples of the coverage: 

The Hill, which is considered center, reported that Lake’s lawyers wrote in a court filing: “’Arizona-certified optical scanners and ballot marking devices, as well as the software on which they rely, have been wrongly certified for use’; Arizona’s voting machines had been ‘hacked’ and ‘manipulated’; and that there were apparent discrepancies in the Maricopa County’s vote count after the 2020 election.”

Left-leaning CNN reported that when the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals  dismissed the lawsuit it wrote: “Although Lake and Finchem cited ‘opinions by purported experts on manipulation risk’ in the lawsuit, they did ‘not contend that any electronic tabulation machine in Arizona has ever been hacked,’ the appeals court said. On appeal, the court continued, lawyers for Lake ‘conceded that their arguments were limited to potential future hacking, and not based on any past harm.'”

The local Tucson outlet, also a center outlet, pointed out that Lake, “sought to have the 2022 election conducted with paper ballots which would be counted by hand, calling it ‘the most effective and presently the only secure election method.’ But Arizonans already vote on paper ballots; it is only the total that are tabulated by machines.”

All the outlets reported that the Supreme Court made no comment when it decided not to hear the case, which is common.

Straight Arrow News strives to provide unbiased, fact-based news in addition to offering a comprehensive look at how the media is covering stories that matter most. Learn more about the Media Miss™ tool and decide for yourself.

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[RAY BOGAN]

The Supreme Court declined to hear a challenge to the use of electronic voting machines in Arizona brought by former Gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake, R. Lake sued ahead of the 2022 midterms when she was running for Governor, now she’s running for the United States Senate and her lawyers argued that’s why this case is still relevant and should be heard. 

According to the media miss tool on SAN.com, conservative outlets are ignoring this story. A majority of the organizations covering this story are considered center, more than a third lean left, but none lean right. 

Here’s some of the coverage: 

The Hill, which is considered center, reports that Lake’s lawyers wrote in a court filing:  “Arizona-certified optical scanners and ballot marking devices, as well as the software on which they rely, have been wrongly certified for use”; Arizona’s voting machines had been “hacked” and “manipulated”; and that there were apparent discrepancies in the Maricopa County’s vote count after the 2020 election. 

Left leaning CNN wrote that when the 9th circuit court of appeals  dismissed the lawsuit it wrote – Although Lake and Finchem cited “opinions by purported experts on manipulation risk” in the lawsuit, they did “not contend that any electronic tabulation machine in Arizona has ever been hacked,” the appeals court said. On appeal, the court continued, lawyers for Lake “conceded that their arguments were limited to potential future hacking, and not based on any past harm.”

The local Tucson outlet, also a center outlet, pointed out that Lake, “sought to have the 2022 election conducted with paper ballots which would be counted by hand, calling it “the most effective and presently the only secure election method.” But Arizonans already vote on paper ballots; it is only the total that are tabulated by machines.” 

All the outlets reported that the Supreme Court made no comment when it decided not to hear the case, which is common.