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Yosemite National Park urges visitors: Don’t bury toilet paper!

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In a recent Facebook post accompanied by compelling photos, Yosemite Park officials issued a plea: “DON’T BURY TOILET PAPER!” The images capture the park’s natural beauty — flowing water, majestic mountains and serene greenery — but also reveal the unsightly presence of used toilet paper near Rancheria Falls.

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The park emphasized that burying toilet paper poses several problems. The used paper is exposed to weather, it can take 1-3 years to decompose, and animals may dig it up and use it for nesting.

“Ew,” the post said.

With over a million visitors trekking through Yosemite between June and August, proper restroom etiquette is crucial. The park advocates following the “Leave No Trace” ethics to preserve the wilderness and create lasting memories, not messes.

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Yosemite’s website provides detailed guidance on handling nature’s call.

“Don’t be embarrassed; everyone must go sometime,” a woman featured in the park’s video reassures visitors. “Just do it correctly outdoors.”

Given that many campsites and hiking trails lack restrooms, here’s the National Park Service’s recommended process:

Choose a site:

Select an area at least 200 feet from water or off the trail, allowing human waste to decompose naturally and minimizing disease spread.

Dig a cathole:

Create a hole 6 to 8 inches deep and 4 to 6 inches in diameter.

Proper disposal:

After use, fill the hole with original dirt and cover it with leaves and debris. Do not put toilet paper in the hole or nearby. Instead, pack out used toilet paper in a sealed plastic bag or container and dispose of it properly.

By adhering to these guidelines, the National Park Service said visitors can help keep all national parks clean and healthy.

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[LAUREN TAYLOR]

DON’T BURY TOILET PAPER AT YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK!

THAT’S WHAT THE PARK IS PLEADING IN A FACEBOOK POST …

 COMPLETE WITH THESE PHOTOS.

THE FLOWING WATER, BEAUTIFUL MOUNTAINS, SERENE GREENERY… AND THEN, YUP – USED TOILET PAPER GREETING YOU ON YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE NEXT TO RANCHERIA FALLS. 

PLEASE DON’T BURY TOILET PAPER” — THE PARK SAID.  IT’S EXPOSED TO WEATHER, ANIMALS CAN DIG IT UP AND USE IT FOR NESTING AND IT CAN ALSO TAKE 1-3 YEARS TO DECOMPOSE.

 WITH MORE THAN A MILLION VISITORS TREKKING THROUGH YOSEMITE BETWEEN JUNE AND AUGUST – THE PARK WARNS – THERE’S A PROPER WAY TO USE THE RESTROOM IN THE WILDERNESS – AND IT DOESN’T INCLUDE LEAVING REMNANTS OF YOUR BUSINESS BEHIND.

THE PARK STRESSES YOU FOLLOW THE LEAVE NO TRACE ETHICS TO ENSURE YOU’RE MAKING MEMORIES, NOT MESSES.

THERE’S A WHOLE EXPLANATION ON YOSEMITE’S WEBSITE ON WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE TO GO NUMBER 2.

(CREDIT: YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK)

“DON’T BE EMBARRASSED. EVERYONE MUST GO SOMETIME. IT’S JUST IMPORTANT TO DO IT CORRECTLY IN THE OUTDOORS.”

[LAUREN TAYLOR] 

MANY OF YOSEMITE’S CAMPSITES AND HIKING TRAILS DON’T HAVE RESTROOMS.

THE FIRST STEP YOU TAKE IS TO PICK A SITE “UNTRAVELED BY PEOPLE” MEANING TWO HUNDRED FEET FROM WATER AND OR OFF THE TRAIL WHERE WASTE CAN MORE EASILY DECOMPOSE AND LESSEN THE CHANCE OF SPREADING DISEASE.

STEP TWO – DIG A CATHOLE: A HOLE IN THE GROUND ABOUT 6-8 INCHES DEEP AND 4-6 INCHES IN DIAMETER.

STEP THREE – WHEN YOU’RE FINISHED WITH YOUR BUSINESS – FILL THE HOLE WITH ORIGINAL DIRT AND DISGUISE IT WITH LEAVES AND DEBRIS. AND DON’T PUT YOUR TOILET PAPER IN THE HOLE OR NEAR THE HOLE.

ALWAYS PACK OUT THE USED T-P IN A PLASTIC ZIPPER BAG OR CONTAINER – MAKE SURE IT’S SEALED TIGHT — AND PUT IT IN THE TRASH.

THE PARK SAYS THIS IS THE BEST WAY TO KEEP ALL NATIONAL PARKS CLEAN AND HEALTHY.

FOR SAN, I’M LAUREN TAYLOR.