Skip to main content

Unbiased. Straight Facts.TM

U.S.

DEA issues warning over rainbow fentanyl targeting young people

Sep 28, 2022

Share

The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning the public of an alarming emerging trend of colorful fentanyl available across the United States.

A new wave of multi-colored “rainbow fentanyl” pills, powders and blocks that look similar to candy have been seized in at least 21 states. According to the DEA, this trend appears to be a new method used by drug cartels to sell highly addictive and potentially deadly fentanyl to children and young people.

“It’s a deliberate effort by drug traffickers to drive addiction amongst kids and young adults,” DEA Administrator Anne Milgram said. Every color, shape and size of fentanyl should be considered extremely dangerous, the DEA warns.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 times more potent than heroin and 100 times more potent than morphine. Just two milligrams of fentanyl, which is equal to 10 to 15 grains of table salt, is considered a lethal dose. Without laboratory testing, there is no way to know how much fentanyl is concentrated in a pill or powder.

Since the DEA issued its warning, some colleges and universities have begun cautioning their students about the rising trend and the threats of rainbow fentanyl. While fentanyl remains the deadliest drug threat facing the nation, the DEA did not specify any reports of overdoses or deaths attributed specifically to rainbow fentanyl.

In 2021, a record number of Americans – 107,622 – died from a drug poisoning or overdose. Sixty-six percent of those deaths can be attributed to synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, based on CDC data.

This week, the Justice Department announced that the DEA and its law enforcement partners seized more than 10.2 million fentanyl pills and approximately 980 pounds of fentanyl powder during the period of May 23 through Sept. 8. The amount of fentanyl taken off the streets during this surge is equivalent to more than 36 million lethal doses removed from the illegal drug supply. Of the 390 cases investigated during this period, 51 cases are linked to overdose poisonings and 35 cases link directly to one or both of the primary Mexican cartels responsible for the majority of fentanyl in the United States — the Sinaloa Cartel and the Jalisco New Generation Cartel.

In September 2021, the DEA launched the One Pill Can Kill public awareness campaign to educate Americans about the dangers of fake pills. They advise parents and caregivers to talk to teens and young adults about the dangers of these illicit drugs.

Tags: , ,

MAHMOUD BENNETT:

THERE’S AN ALARMING AMOUNT OF FENTANYL SPREADING ACROSS THE U.S. AND HEALTH OFFICIALS ARE WARNING OF A NEW TYPE TARGETING CHILDREN

YOU’RE LOOKING AT RAINBOW FENTANYL – ACCORDING TO THE DRUG ENFORCEMENT AGENCY THESE BRIGHT COLORED PILLS ARE BEING MADE TO LOOK JUST LIKE CANDY IN AN EFFORT TO ENTICE YOUNGER USERS AND GET THEM HOOKED

THIS HIGHLY ADDICTIVE DRUG COMES IN MULTIPLE FORMS: PILLS, POWDER, AND BLOCKS

JUST TWO MILLIGRAMS – ABOUT THE EQUIVALENT TO 10 GRAINS OF SALT –  *COULD KILL YOU*

IT’S 100 TIMES MORE POTENT THAN MORPHINE AND 50 TIMES MORE POTENT THAN HEROIN

MAKING IT THE DEADLIEST DRUG IN THE COUNTRY ACCORDING TO THE CDC – WHICH SAYS MORE THAN 100 THOUSAND AMERICANS DIED OF DRUG OVERDOSES FROM OPIOIDS LIKE THESE LAST YEAR –

ACCORDING TO THE DEA – FENTANYL SUPPLY IN THE U.S. COMES PRIMARILY OUT OF TWO CRIMINAL DRUG NETWORKS IN MEXICO – AHEAD OF THE UPCOMING ELECTION IT’S BECOME A POLITICAL PRESSURE POINT

SOME ON THE RIGHT POINT TO BORDER MISMANAGEMENT

KEVIN MCCARTHY:

WE WILL SECURE OUR BORDER SO YOUR KIDS WON’T HAVE TO FEAR WONDERING THAT THEY’RE BUYING FENTANYL AND ARE GOING TO OD

MAHMOUD BENNETT:

BUT RECENT BORDER PATROL DATA SHOWS ALMOST 85% OF FENTANYL SEIZED BY US OFFICIALS HAPPENS AT LEGAL PORTS OF ENTRY

CNN:

THE IMAGE REPUBLICANS ARE TRYING TO CREATE … NOT THE PREDOMINANT STORY

MAHMOUD BENNETT:

RAINBOW FENTANYL HAS BEEN FOUND IN AT LEAST 21 STATES –  THE DEA IS ENCOURAGING PARENTS TO TALK TO THEIR TEENAGERS ABOUT THE DANGERS OF THESE ILLICIT DRUGS


By entering your email, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and acknowledge the Privacy Policy.