Skip to main content

Newt Gingrich

Former House Speaker; Chairman of Gingrich 360

Share
Opinion

How AI is changing the world

Apr 24

Share

Newt Gingrich

Former House Speaker; Chairman of Gingrich 360

Share

Artificial intelligence (AI) is significantly reshaping numerous sectors, including banking, education, finance and technology. Its impact extends across various industries, including the military sector, where companies are leveraging AI to enhance productivity and streamline operations.

Straight Arrow News contributor Newt Gingrich is excited about the future application for artificial intelligence and provides examples of how AI is revolutionizing warfare, health care and more.

In many ways, what we just saw happen recently in Israel, where the Iranians fired probably 335 missiles and drones and ballistic missiles, and 99% of them were stopped, was an example of applied artificial intelligence, analyzing and tracking in real time.

We’ve known for example that you could take an MRI of your heart and have a computer analyze it, and the computer would actually be more accurate than a doctor.

And so we’ve had applied artificial intelligence for a long time. It’s gotten bigger, faster, more complex. And then you had the rise of systems like Google or Facebook or Microsoft that allow you, for example, to drive down the road, and it will tell you, you know, where you are, and where you’re going. I find it to be virtually magic.

So you’re going to see a lot more developments in this direction. They’re going to be a lot more powerful. And in the future, I’ll report to you about very specific big breakthroughs in how we use artificial intelligence.

Artificial Intelligence and Artificial General Intelligence may be one of the biggest changes in human history. Artificial intelligence is the ability to use information to do a particular thing. To drive a car, to manage the air traffic control one thing, but it can’t switch and do something else. Artificial General Intelligence, which really doesn’t exist yet, but people are working at it all over the world, is the ability to think and learn and shift. So imagine you had a computer that could learn on the one hand, how to write music, like Mozart, and on the other hand, how to do brain surgery. And he could shift back and forth. Now, in some ways, this is not quite as dramatic, as sort of black and white. I mean, the fact is, we have gradually seen a buildup of our ability to use information for the last 70 or 80 years. If you look back to how we broke the German code, and the Japanese code in World War Two, it was an early use of computing, to be able to start figuring out what the other person was doing. By the 1970s, early 1980s, the US Navy, which was faced with a challenge, particularly in the North Atlantic, of a Soviet threat, that would involve bombers, and got and missiles, and torpedoes, all coming at different speeds from different directions, and potentially coming in huge numbers, four or 500, aimed at a carrier battle group. So they developed and I went out to San Diego, to the Navy research labs, to want to look at and study. This will be probably in the mid 1980s, an ability a system that could gather all this data electronically integrate it in real time. And say, here are the 10 most dangerous focus on these first, and then shift around. So as you killed some of the missiles, others would then pop up when you go after them next. In many ways, what we just saw happen recently, in Israel, where the Iranians fired probably 335 missiles and drones and ballistic missiles, and 99% of them were stopped, was an example of applied artificial intelligence, analyzing and tracking in real time. Known for good while for example, that you could take a lives, let’s say, a heart goofing around, for example, that you could take an MRI of your heart and have a computer analyze it, and the computer would actually be more accurate than a doctor. And so we’ve had applied artificial intelligence for a long time. It’s gotten bigger, faster, more complex. And then you had the rise of systems like Google, or Facebook, or Microsoft, that allow you for example, to drive down the road. And it will tell you, you know where you are, and where you’re going, I find it to be virtually magic. So you’re going to see a lot more developments in this direction. They’re going to be a lot more powerful. And in the future. I’ll report to you about very specific big breakthroughs and how we use artificial intelligence

Video Library

Latest Commentary

We know it is important to hear from a diverse range of observers on the complex topics we face and believe our commentary partners will help you reach your own conclusions.

The commentaries published in this section are solely those of the contributors and do not reflect the views of Straight Arrow News.


Latest Opinions

In addition to the facts, we believe it’s vital to hear perspectives from all sides of the political spectrum. We hope these different voices will help you reach your own conclusions.

The opinions published in this section are solely those of the contributors and do not reflect the views of Straight Arrow News.

Weekly Voices

Left Opinion Right Opinion

Tuesday

Left Opinion Right Opinion

Wednesday

Left Opinion Right Opinion

Thursday

Left Opinion Right Opinion

Friday

Left Opinion Right Opinion